Bullying

What Is Bullying?

Bullying can happen to anyone at any age. Being bullied at school, home or online might involve someone pushing you, hitting you, teasing you, talking about you or calling you names. Nobody has the right to hurt you or make you feel bad. If you are being bullied you don’t have to deal with it alone – talking to someone about it can often really help.

Physical bullying can include:

  • Taking your money or personal belongings
  • Pushing, hitting, kicking or punching
  • Sexual abuse, including unwanted physical contact or comments

Verbal bullying can include:

  • Teasing
  • Sarcasm
  • Name calling
  • Continually ignoring someone
  • Racist and/or sexual remarks

Indirect bullying can include:

  • Spreading rumours or starting gossip about you
  • Getting you into trouble for no real reason
  • Excluding you
  • Sending you hurtful messages via text message, email, telephone, letters or on Social Networking Sites

Do you feel that you, or someone you know is being bullied?

Always tell someone if you feel that you are being bullied such as a teacher or your parents.

The websites below contain information and guidance for children and young people affected by bullying, including videos made by teenagers and cyber mentors/emailing advice service

Young Minds

Teens against Bullying

Kidscape

Bullying UK

Stop. Speak. Support.


CAMHS

Hampshire Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) is an NHS specialist service, provided by Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust for young people aged 5-18 years and their families who are experiencing difficulties with their mental and emotional health. Many young people experience difficulties with their mental health such as anxiety, low mood, trauma, eating difficulties, plus many others which can impact on all aspects of life such as education, home life, hobbies and interests, socialising and having fun.

It is important to know that everyone has mental health and that we can all experience tough times and this can cause our mental health to suffer. CAMHS work with young people, their families and other important organisations (such as schools) to achieve the following:

• Assess and diagnose mental health and neurodevelopmental difficulties
• Identify realistic goals or changes that you would like to make
• Identify and build on your strengths
• Improve self-esteem and confidence to cope with difficulties
• Learn emotional coping techniques to help manage difficult or upsetting thoughts, feelings, urges or experiences
• Empower you to identify, express and communicate your needs, take responsibility for your health and wellbeing and feel confident in knowing where and how to get additional support if necessary

CAMHS have put together a list of some of the things that you might be experiencing, or some of the difficulties that you might be having, and some top tips on how to manage them. This can be found on their website at: www.hampshirecamhs.nhs.uk